Friday, April 1, 2016

Physicians Recieving Botox Score Lower on Empathy and Patient Satisfaction

by Abe R. Feaulx, Pallimed Special Reporter



Researchers published a new study in JMAC (The Journal of Middle Aged Concerns)  reporting interesting findings related to a recent study on the effect of various anti-aging cosmetic procedures on providers’ ability to emote empathy to patients and families.



Providers in the study were randomized into two groups: one group received injections of an inactivated toxin commonly used as a facial muscle paralytic into their foreheads, while the second group received placebo injections. Over the course of the following month, the providers were scored, by their patients, on how well the patients felt the provider expressed empathy and compassion. Results were...surprising.



In the intervention group, providers who had previously received very high scores for their patient empathy prior to receiving the injections, saw their empathy scores decrease. One patient commented, “Dr J used to always let me know she knew what I was feeling just by the worried look on her face. Now she just always looks surprised by what I tell her. It’s like she hadn’t ever heard that I had stage 4 cancer.”



Although empathy scores were lower, patients did make note of other findings. “It seems like Dr. B is so much happier these days. It’s like he finally started following his own advice about getting sleep and taking care of himself. He looks AMAZING!”


Check out more surprising reporting from Abe R. Feaulx on Pallimed.

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